Elk artists dream big

by Jim Boyle

Editor

Martin Luther King Jr.’s spirit as a dreamer is alive and well in the hearts and artistic hands of at least four Elk River High School seniors.

Cayla Weatherly keyed in on the fact that Martin Luther King Jr. was a dreamer at heart for her entry into “The Dream @ 50 Art Contest.” She was second runner-up in the contest open to students in Minneapolis, St. Paul and the suburbs.

Cayla Weatherly keyed in on the fact that Martin Luther King Jr. was a dreamer at heart for her entry into “The Dream @ 50 Art Contest.” She was second runner-up in the contest open to students in Minneapolis, St. Paul and the suburbs.

They were among nine semifinalists in the high school division to be recognized last month at the Minneapolis Convention Center for their contributions to the “The Dream @ 50 Art Contest.”

The Elk River High School students to rub elbows with WCCO’s Reg Chapman who served as the emcee and Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Ryback were Cayla Weatherly, Tyler Cundiff, Cara Fromm,  and Jordan Mathewson. Weatherly also came away with first-runner up honors for her graphite depiction of King.

dream at 50 logoHigh school students like Weatherly and Mathewson seemed to easily grasp the idea of dreams, perhaps because they have some of their own. Weatherly is an aspiring neuroscientist, with notions of offering up medical illustrations to help her way through school. Mathewson, is an aspiring graphic designer, with one more line filled to fill in on her college scholarship forms. She has applied and been accepted at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. She applied noting she had entered a couple prestigious art contests. Now she can report she was a semifinalist for the Dream @ 50 contest and she is awaiting word on how she fared in a Scholastic writing and art contest, she said.

Nikita Skorykh’s work of art impressed the Elk River High School staff.

Nikita Skorykh’s work of art impressed the Elk River High School staff.

“This was really an honor,” she said of the Minneapolis outpost of the Dream @ 50 contest.

“I knew the whole Martin Luther King movement was a big thing but I thought it had shifted away from being as big a deal,” she said. “I have learned that it’s still a big deal.

“His dream is getting there, but there’s still a ways to go in certain areas (to make it a reality).”

Cara Fromm keyed in the manacles of segregation for her contest entry.

Cara Fromm keyed in the manacles of segregation for her contest entry.

The focus of her entry into the contest was “Standing Together.” Mathewson states that it was people standing together that made a difference back when King was alive and that is how more progress will be made now.

“Without it happening nothing could be accomplished,” she said.

Weatherly keyed in on the idea that King was a dreamer, a fact she highlighted by a Harriet Tubman quote stating “Every great dream begins with a dreamer.”

She appreciated being around other artists as passionate as she is about her craft, and she was amazed at the level of respect King still commands.

Jordan Mathewson showed the importance of standing together.

Jordan Mathewson showed the importance of standing together.

Weatherly’s dream is to someday research neurological diseases. Art serves as a release from the busy demands of such a pursuit. In order to take the art class that she created her King drawing in she had to juggle her anatomy class and five other college level courses. She also had to sign up for an independent study to get art class she wanted, she said.

Photo by Jim Boyle Jordan Mathewson was one of the Elk River Arts Magnet students to show her work off at the premiere of Woody Mann’s “The Street Singer” at Union Congregational Church for a Martin Luther King Jr. Day event.

Photo by Jim Boyle
Jordan Mathewson was one of the Elk River Arts Magnet students to show her work off at the premiere of Woody Mann’s “The Street Singer” at Union Congregational Church for a Martin Luther King Jr. Day event.

“It’s a lot of work, but I like pushing myself,” she said.

So did Martin Luther King Jr.

Students, and parents and teachers alike were blown away about the success of Elk River students in the contest, with nearly half of the semifinalists coming from Elk River High School in a contest open to all metro-area schools.

“I think it says a lot about the arts program at the school and the talent in the school,” said Nina Mathewson, the mother of Jordan Mathewson.

Tyler Cundiff’s entry made him one of the four semifinalists for the Dream @ 50 Art Contest.

Tyler Cundiff’s entry made him one of the four semifinalists for the Dream @ 50 Art Contest.

About the contest

THE DREAM@50 is a tribute series for the 2012-13 school year to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

Including a student art contest, a world music/dance festival, and video PSAs, THE DREAM@50 is a celebration of creative collaboration in both the Civil Rights Movement and the arts as the foundation for a new paradigm in how we can live together.

THE DREAM@50 Art Contest was offered to K-12 students in ten U.S. cities including the Minneapois/St. Paul area, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Memphis, Detroit, Chicago, Los Angeles and and San Francisco/Bay Area.

Submitted photo Cayla Weatherly, Jordan Mathewson, Cara Fromm, Arts Magnet teacher Rana Nestrud and Tyler Cundiff at the Awards ceremony.

Submitted photo
Cayla Weatherly, Jordan Mathewson, Cara Fromm, Arts Magnet teacher Rana Nestrud and Tyler Cundiff at the Awards ceremony.

Students are invited to create artwork inspired by a word or phrase from The Dream Speech, with the artwork titled accordingly.

Each participating school or after-school program selects a winner to be submitted on-line for the selection of the semifinalists. All submissions must be made through a designated representative of the participating school or after-school program.

A jury of distinguished judges will select from the semifinalists one winner and two runner-ups in each of the three school categories (Elementary, Middle, and High) and one over-all Grand Prize winner, for a total of ten winners. The winners will be announced in an awards ceremony hosted by each of the cities in January/February 2013. Gift card prizes will be presented to the winners as well as to their teachers (for use in the classroom).

The Grand Prize winner from each of the ten cities will be honored in a special Capitol Hill awards ceremony and exhibit to take place in August 2013.

The aim of The Dream@50 Art Contest is to clarify the relevance of history for our young people, to demonstrate the vital importance of the arts in education and daily life, and to build stronger communities based on mutual understanding and respect.

 

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