Zimmerman man sentenced for producing child porn

by Jim Boyle
Editor
Scott James Whitcomb, 49, of Zimmerman, was sentenced Thursday in federal court in St. Paul for producing images of three teenage boys engaging in sexually explicit conduct.
United States District Court Judge Susan Richard Nelson sentenced him to 300 months in prison on one count of production of child pornography.
Whitcomb was indicted earlier this year on Jan. 19, and he pleaded guilty on April 19.
In his plea agreement, Whitcomb admitted that between 2007 and 2010, he produced pornographic videos containing images of the three boys, two of whom were between the ages of 12 and 16, while the third was younger than 12.
In addition, Whitcomb admitted storing the images on digital cameras, memory sticks and computers.
Following the sentencing, Donald E. Oswald, special agent in charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Minneapolis Field Office, said, “The FBI will continue to work alongside its law enforcement partners to pursue cyber predators who prey on innocent children through sexual exploitation.”
According to a law enforcement affidavit, Whitcomb’s activity was discovered last August, while a Minneapolis police officer was conducting an online undercover operation in search of those who share child pornography through peer-to-peer Internet networks.
The Sherburne County Sheriff’s Office subsequently executed a search warrant at Whitcomb’s residence, where they seized two computers containing images of the boys. Whitcomb was arrested
Whitcomb is a former employee of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Whitcomb also served as a U.S. air marshal and prison guard.
This case was the result of an investigation by Minneapolis police, an affiliate agency of the Minnesota Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, as well as the Sherburne County Sheriff’s Office and the Minnesota Cyber Crimes Task Force, which is sponsored by the FBI and the U.S. Secret Service. The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney David  Steinkamp.
For more information, visit the department’s Project Safe Childhood website, at www.projectsafechildhood.gov.

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